Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Portmann Cigar Trophy


Earlier this month the 1st Portmann Cigar Trophy took place at the Golf Club in Erlen. With the financial support of Davidoff as main sponsor and some other companies as co-sponsors, Marc and Thomas Portmann have organized this fantastic event. Approximately 100 people who played that tournament in flights of 4 people joined and played the 18 holes on a day with perfect weather.

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Marc Portmann









Thomas Portmann






























Davidoff cigar supply

Davidoff cigar supply


Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Bolivar Emperador ER Russia 2011


I received this cigar from another Swiss aficionado who is running the blog cigar.land during the presentation of the Partagas book from Amir.

I never tried those before therefore I was really looking forward to smoke that Grand Corona sized cigar, an Hermosos No. 2.

The smell's is really good... cedar wood, some pepper and leather... I just tend to call it some kinda brutish! I am sure that this is one of those smokes which is more Bolivar-like with strong flavors, that's what I am expecting after that cold smell.

Let's fire it up... cut the cap... then the first puff.. a mouthful of exotic spices... intensive woody notes and aromas of fresh herbs... all very intensive and definitely not on the light side. The woody aromas fade a way after a while but the herbs and spices are present during the first third.

With the beginning of the second third white pepper starts to distinguish, bites a little bit in the nose while nose-exhaling, but the taste is very pleasant. Some earthiness is coming up, fighting its way in this strong profile mixed with some damp greenery and oak wood.

The last third is dominated by two very characteristic flavors: leather and earth. That's what I would expect of a typical Bolivar. The aroma is very intensive and the cigar itself is strong, it needs a good meal before. There are still some hints of pepper and from time to time I can taste some cilantro...

It's very easy to nub this cigar down during a smoking time of 120 minutes, draw and burn are really perfect, the flavor is great. There's no reason to complain!

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Thursday, July 17, 2014

Moeraki Boulders


Moeraki Boulders... another must see on your NZ bucket list... nothing fancy but it's cool. If you're on your way to Dunedin or the Nugget Point Lighthouse you can also make a stop there...

As I have no deep knowledge about this phenomen I'd like to quote from wikipedia.com:
"They occur scattered either as isolated or clusters of boulders within a stretch of beach where they have been protected in a scientific reserve. The erosion by wave action of mudstone, comprising local bedrock and landslides, frequently exposes embedded isolated boulders. These boulders are grey-colored septarian concretions, which have been exhumed from the mudstone enclosing them and concentrated on the beach by coastal erosion. 
... 
Local Māori legends explained the boulders as the remains of eel baskets, calabashes, and kumara washed ashore from the wreck of Arai-te-uru, a large sailing canoe. This legend tells of the rocky shoals that extend seaward from Shag Point as being the petrified hull of this wreck and a nearby rocky promontory as being the body of the canoe's captain. In 1848 W.B.D. Mantell sketched the beach and its boulders, more numerous than now. The picture is now in the Alexander Turnbull Library in Wellington. The boulders were described in 1850 colonial reports and numerous popular articles since that time. In more recent times they have become a popular tourist attraction, often described and pictured in numerous web pages and tourist guides.
...
The most striking aspect of the boulders is their unusually large size and spherical shape, with a distinct bimodal size distribution. Approximately one-third of the boulders range in size from about 0.5 to 1.0 metre (1.6 to 3.3 ft) in diameter, the other two-thirds from 1.5 to 2.2 metres (4.9 to 7.2 ft), mostly spherical or almost spherical. A small proportion of them are not spherical; being slightly elongated parallel to the bedding of the mudstone that once enclosed them.
... 
As determined by detailed analysis of the fine-grained rock using optical mineralogy, X-ray crystallography, and electron microprobe, the boulders consist of mud, fine silt and clay, cemented by calcite. The degree of cementation varies from being relatively weak within the interior of a boulder to quite hard within its outside rim. The outside rims of the larger boulders consist of as much as 10 to 20 % calcite, because the calcite not only tightly cements the silt and clay but has also replaced it to a significant degree. 
... 
The rock comprising the bulk of a boulder is riddled with large cracks called "septaria" that radiate outward from a hollow core lined with scalenohedral calcite crystals. The process or processes that created septaria within Moeraki Boulders, and in other septarian concretions, remain an unresolved matter for which a number of possible explanations have been proposed. These cracks radiate and thin outward from the centre of the typical boulder and are typically filled with an outer (early stage) layer of brown calcite and an inner (late stage) layer of yellow calcite spar, which often, but not always, completely fills the cracks. Rare Moeraki Boulders have a very thin innermost (latest stage) layer of dolomite and quartz covering the yellow calcite spar.
The composition of the Moeraki Boulders and the septaria that they contain are typical of, often virtually identical to, septarian concretions that have been found in exposures of sedimentary rocks in New Zealand and elsewhere. Pearson and Nelson (2005, 2006) describe in detail the occurrence of smaller but otherwise very similar septarian concretions within exposures of sedimentary rocks elsewhere in New Zealand. Similar septarian concretions have been found in the Kimmeridge Clay and Oxford Clay of England, and at many other locations worldwide. 
The Moeraki Boulders are concretions created by the cementation of the Paleocene mudstone of the Moeraki Formation, from which they have been exhumed by coastal erosion. 
The main body of the boulders started forming in what was then marine mud, near the surface of the Paleocene sea floor. This is demonstrated by studies of their composition; specifically the magnesium and iron content, and stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon. Their spherical shape indicates that the source of calcium was mass diffusion, as opposed to fluid flow. 
The larger boulders, 2 metres (6.6 ft) in diameter, are estimated to have taken 4 to 5.5 million years to grow while 10 to 50 metres (33 to 164 ft) of marine mud accumulated on the seafloor above them. After the concretions formed, large cracks known as septaria formed in them. Brown calcite, yellow calcite, and small amounts of dolomite and quartz progressively filled these cracks when a drop in sea level allowed fresh groundwater to flow through the mudstone enclosing them."

Here are some pictures I made on the day of our visit there...

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